1990 Kyoto Prize Laureates

Basic Sciences

Biological Sciences(Evolution, Behavior, Ecology, Environment)

Jane Goodall

/  Primatologist

1934 -

Scientific Director, The Gombe Stream Research Center

Commemorative Lectures

The Chimpanzee—a Living Bridge Between Man and Beast

1990

10 /24 Wed

Place:Kyoto International Conference Center

Workshop

Humanity's Bridge to Our Animal Heritage

1990

10 /25 Thu

13:00 - 17:25

Place:Kyoto International Conference Center

Achievement Digest

Long-Term Study of Behavior, Sociology, and Ecology of Chimpanzees in the Wild

A primatologist who not only impacted accepted views of humanity and drastically changed the evolutionary theory of man, but also influenced the development of theories in behavioral science. Through thirty years of continuous observation of free-living chimpanzees at the Gombe National Park on the northeast coast of Lake Tanganyika, she elucidated their behavior, society, and ecology. She thereby demonstrated that certain behavior and abilities, which were considered intrinsic only to human beings, were actually present in the society of chimpanzees as well.

*This field then was Field of Biological Sciences (Behavior, Ecology and Environment).

Citation

Dr. Jane Goodall began her research of free-living chimpanzees in 1960 at the Gombe National Park on the northeast coast of Lake Tanganyika, Africa, and through 30 years of continuous observations, she revealed their behavior, society, and ecology. She has made many startling discoveries including the utilization and production of tools, hunting and meat eating, begging and distribution of food, various social adjustment behaviors, coordination among individuals, infanticide, and warfare including massacre among groups. She thereby demonstrated that certain behavior and abilities, which were considered intrinsic only to human beings, are actually present in the society of chimpanzees as well.

With these discoveries, she carefully and extensively traced the mother-child bond in natural surroundings, and as a result, arrived at many findings which comprise the essence of her work. Dr. Goodall demonstrated that the chimpanzees, which have a long life span, go through a process of complex socialization. Such spectacular results of research could be accomplished only by a true naturalist whose unique methodology would not be possible without life-long devotion to this work.

As it becomes even more important for mankind to reassess its nature from a scientific standpoint, Dr. Goodall’s research has provided a very important fresh starting point for the development of such research. Dr. Goodall’s research not only impacted accepted views of humanity and drastically changed the evolutionary theory of man, but it also influenced the development of theories in behavioral science.

Along with her research on chimpanzees, Dr. Goodall has also conducted remarkable research on the spotted hyena and the olive baboon. In addition, her efforts regarding environmental protection deserve high praise.

In natural science, theoretical bases are formulated after extensive observations and careful experimentation. Dr. Goodall’s achievements on the free-living chimpanzees were often conducted alone under difficult conditions for long periods of time. Through her efforts, she has provided one of natural science’s basic building blocks. Therefore, she is a most suitable laureate for the 1990 Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences.

Profile

Biography
1934
Born in London, England
1952
Higher Certificate (London)
1962
Entered Cambridge University, England, as Ph.D. candidate in ethology under Professor Robert Hind
1965
Ph.D. degree in ethology
1967
Scientific Director, The Gombe Stream Research Center
1973
Honorary Visiting Professor in Zoology, University of Dar es Salaam
Selected Awards and Honors
1963/1964
Franklin Burr Award
1970
Stott Science Award, Cambridge University
1972
Honorary Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1974
Brad Washburn Award, the Boston Museum of Science
1980
Order of the Golden Ark, W.W.F.
1984
The J. Paul Getty Wildlife Conservation Prize, W.W.F.
Major Works
1973
Cultural elements in a chimpanzee community. In Precultural primate behaviour, Vol. 1 (ed. W.E. Menzel). Karger: Fourth IPC Symposia Proceedings.
1977
Infant-killing and cannibalism in free-livng chimpanzees. Folia Primatologica.
1979
Inter-community interactions in the chimpanzee population of the Gombe National Park. In The Great Apes, (eds. D.A.Hamburg and E.R.McCown). California: Benjamin/Cummings.
1983
Population dynamics during a 15 year period in one community of free-living chimpanzees in the Gombe National Park. Z. Tierpsychologie.
1986
The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behaviour. Boston: Harvard University Press.

Profile is at the time of the award.

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