2006Arts and PhilosophyArts (Painting, Sculpture, Craft, Architecture, Photography, Design, etc.)
Issey Miyake photo

Issey Miyake

  • Japan / April 22, 1938
  • Designer

A designer who has made great contribution to the innovative development of clothing by fusing Eastern and Western cultures and applying cutting edge technology

Mr. Issey Miyake, with his originality, has recaptured the relationship between plane fabrics and the three-dimensionality of the human body and formulated the epoch-making concept of "a piece of cloth (A-POC)" rooted in Eastern culture. Applying this concept and cutting edge technology to his designs, he has been creating clothing that can become a part of people's lives, cutting across time, national borders, and classes.

Profile

Brief Biography

1938
Born in Hiroshima, Japan
1959
Tama Art University, B.A. (Graphic Design)
1965
Study at La Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, assistant designer to Guy Laroche,Paris, assistant designer to Givenchy, Paris, Designer to Geoffery Beene, New York
1970
Established the Miyake Design Studio,Tokyo
1971
Presented his first collection in New York.
1973
Autum/Winter Collection Paris, since this year, collections have been shown in Paris.
1988
Started working on the "pleats" series
1993
Launched the line "Pleats Please Issey Miyake"
1998
Presentation of the "A-POC"
2004
Establisched the "Miyake Issey Foundation"

Selected Awards and Honors

1977
Mainichi Design Award
1992
Asahi Award
1993
Chevalier de l'ordre national de la Légion d'honneur
1998
Named as a Person of Cultural Merit from the Japanese Goverment
1999
The Georg Jensen Award Denmark
2004
The Weksner Award from Weksner Center, University of Ohio U.S.A.
2005
Praemium Imperiale (Sculpture)

Selected Works

1971

Presented his first collection in New York.

1973

Autum/Winter Collection Paris, since this year, collections have been shown in Paris.

1977

“Issey Miyake and a piece of cloth” exhibition, Seibu Art Museum, Tokyo

1979

“East Meets West”, show, at the International Design Conference in Aspen, U.S.A.

1980

Costumes for Maurice Béjart’s ballet, “Casta Diva”, performed at IRCAM, Centre Pompidou, Paris, in collaboration with Tomio Mohri.

1985

“Issey Miyake Bodyworks”, exhibition, Victoria and Albert Museum, London

1990

“Energies”, exhibition, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

1991

Costume for “The Loss of Small Details”, William Forsythe & Frankfurter Ballet

1998-2000

“Issey Miyake Making Things”, exhibition, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris; ACE Gallery, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo

2001

“A-POC Making. Issey Miyake & Dai Fujiwara”, exhibition, Vitra Design Museum, Berlin

2005

“Big Bang”, exhibition, Centre Pompidou, Paris

Citation

A designer who has made great contribution to the innovative development of clothing by fusing Eastern and Western cultures and applying cutting edge technology

Mr. Issey Miyake, with his originality, has recaptured the relationship between plane fabrics and the three-dimensionality of the human body, and formulated the epoch-making concept of “one piece of cloth” rooted in Eastern culture. Applying this concept and cutting edge technology to his designs, he has been creating clothing that can become a part of people’s lives, cutting across time, national borders, and classes.

In the 1970s, Mr. Miyake studied foldable forms, a characteristic of Japanese clothing and craftwork, as typified by the Japanese kimono and origami, and started incorporating these concepts into his designs. He applied the three-dimensional property of pleats to cutting and created flat foldable clothes, and in 1993, he launched “PLEATS PLEASE” which do not restrict body movement, while still maintaining their form. With “A-POC” since 1998, by using cutting edge weaving techniques, Mr. Miyake has been able to weave designs and forms into the fabric itself and introduced the epoch-making concept that tube-shaped woven cloth is complete in itself as clothing. By developing these methods, Mr. Miyake brought innovation to clothing production, presenting an ideal for clothing designs, and also proving such clothing can be mass-produced for everyone. Through these approaches he created designs that are not restricted by the limitations of East and West, time, nationality, and social strata. In this way, he has introduced an ideal form of clothing for the new era, as opposed to conventional clothing that is bound by stereotypes.

Mr. Miyake has also had a great influence on other areas of art. He designed costumes for ballets choreographed by Maurice Béjart and William Forsythe and made considerable achievements in this field. His designs have also been introduced around the world for their aesthetic value and are regarded as art characterizing the late 20th century. He held an exhibition entitled “Issey Miyake Making Things” at the Cartier Foundation, Paris; Ace Gallery, New York; and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo from 1998 to 2000. He also participated in the exhibitions, “Energies” at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam in 1990, and “Big Bang” at the Pompidou Centre, Paris in 2005.

As 20th century art moved beyond and transcended traditional genres, Mr. Miyake’s accomplishments made possible the recognition that clothing designs are, without doubt, a legitimate art form. He has been seeking the meaning and ideal forms of clothing and has incorporated old traditions, cutting edge technology and Eastern and Western forms into clothing. Furthermore, his broad-ranging activities have not only had an enormous influence on other art genres, but also proved that clothing design is an excellent medium of expression in contemporary art, and elevated clothing production to a philosophical level.

For these reasons, the Inamori Foundation is pleased to present the 2006 Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy to Mr. Issey Miyake.

Lecture

Abstract of the Lecture

One Life, One Thread, and One Piece of Cloth: The Work of Issey Miyake

I have always lived by the motto, “don’t look back.” I live in the present and look to the future. I was born in Hiroshima and experienced the atomic bomb; I have worked to transform all that experience into an energy and joy whose goal is only to celebrate life. I learned from many people: from my mother, above all, who told me to go forward without fear and with courage; from the dear art teacher at my elementary school, who first introduced me to the joy of creativity; and from the many great mentors whom I have had the great fortune to know and by whom I have been influenced throughout my career; by many good friends. I have also experienced a series of events, each of which has been a source of a major turning point in my life. I believe that my work and the person I am today are the products of each experience and of the guidance of all those whom I have met along the way.

In my speech at the Kyoto Prize Commemorative Lecture, I plan to trace the many unforgettable encounters that, like warp threads, have woven the weft threads of my work. I will begin with “One Piece of Cloth”, a concept I arrived at early on, after having searched for a link between the Eastern and Western cultures, and also discuss my approach to tradition and innovation. This touchstone of A Piece of Cloth has lead to many experiments and evolutionary phases in my work, which has often changed dramatically every eight to ten years. Finally, I will talk about my new work and the next project upon which I am embarking. Through this series of threads, the different fibers of my life’s work, I hope to be able to convey the joy I have always had from the simple act of making things.

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Workshop

Workshop

Symposium: Design, Technology and Tradition

date
November 12, 2006
palce
Kyoto International Conference Center
Coordinator and Supervisor
Shuji Takashina (Chairman, Kyoto Prize Committee in Arts and Philosophy; Principal of Graduate School, Kyoto University of Art and Design)

Program

13:00
Opening Address Shuji Takashina
Introduction to Laureate Akiko Fukai (Member, Kyoto Prize Selection Committee in Arts and Philosophy; Director and Chief Curator, The Kyoto Costume Institute; Dean and Professor, Graduate School of Shizuoka University of Art and Culture)
Laureate Lecture Issey Miyake (the Laureate in Arts and Philosophy)
"Design, Technology and Tradition"
Intermission
Panel Discussion "21_21 DESIGN SIGHT: A Conversation with the Directors"
Moderator: Shuji Takashina
Laureate: Issey Miyake
Panelists: Tadao Ando (Architect, the 2002 Kyoto Prize Laureate in Arts and Philosophy)
Taku Sato (Graphic Designer)
Naoto Fukasawa (Product Designer)
Noriko Kawakami (Design Journalist)
16:30
Closing
PAGETOP