1988Advanced TechnologyInformation Science
John McCarthy photo

John McCarthy

  • U.S.A. / 1927-2011
  • Computer Scientist
  • Professor, Stanford University

Fundamental Contribution to the Field of Artificial Intelligence and the Invention of LISP, a Programming Language

Since the genesis of Artificial Intelligence (AI), he has challenged the basic problems of this field as a leader and is called "the Father of Artificial Intelligence." He has created LISP, a programming language for symbolic processing, considered to be the greatest invention this century in the field of computer science.
*This field then was Field of Computer Science and Engineering, Artificial Intelligence.

Profile

Brief Biography

1927
Born in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.
1948
Graduated from California Institute of Technology
1950
Proctor Fellow, Princeton University
1951
Doctor in Mathematics, Princeton University
1951
Higgins Research Instructor, Princeton University
1953
Acting Assistant Professor, Stanford Universit
1955
Assistant Professor, Dartmouth college
1958
Assistant Professor, MIT
1961
Associate Professor, MIT
1962
Professor, Stanford University

Selected Awards and Honors

1961
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) National Lecturer
1971
A. M. Turing Award from ACM
1977
Sigma Xi National Lecturer
1985
Research Excellence Award, International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI)

Selected Publications

1956

C. E. Shannon and J. McCarthy, Automata Studies, Princeton University Press, 1956.

1958

Programs with Common Sense (McCarthy, J.), Computation & intelligence, 1958.

1962

Time-Sharing Computing Systems (McCarthy, J., and J.W. Maughly), Management and the Computer of the Future, MIT Press, 1962.

1974

Artificial Intelligence, 1974

1977

History of LISP,1977

1980

Circumscription – A Form of Non-Monotonic Reasoning

Citation

Fundamental Contribution to the Field of Artificial Intelligence and the Invention of LISP, a Programming Language

Dr. John McCarthy, born in Boston in 1927, was admitted to the California Institute of Technology at the age of 16. There, he became interested in artificial intelligence (A.I.) during his undergraduate studies. Beginning with his postgraduate work at Princeton University, he has pioneered approaches to the fundamental problems of A.I., a branch of computer science, and remains to this day a leader in the field.

The foremost of his achievements is the study, “Common Sense Reasoning,” in which he attempted to formulize a logic of inference on common sense which could endow computers with a reasoning ability comparable to that of human beings. Since the 1950s he has consistently presented new theories and contributed enormously to the development of this field.

The best known of his accomplishments is the creation of LISP, a programming language for symbolic processing. Unlike conventional programming languages designed for numerical processing, LISP was formulated for efficient processing of symbols, and is used widely today in the research of A.I. The influence of this concept on contemporary programming languages is significant.

Moreover, Dr. McCarthy has written a large number of papers on theories of calculation which are the basis of today’s software science.

In the field of computer engineering, he proposed the basic concept of the Time Sharing System (TSS) and was involved in its development. This work opened the way toward the development of today’s large-scale computers.

In addition to his academic contributions, Dr. McCarthy established the first research project of A.I. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1958, and was the founder of its Artificial Intelligence Lab. After moving to Stanford University, he also established the A.I. Laboratory there.

He has also served as President of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence since 1983, and has received a number of awards for his contributions to the education of younger researchers and to the development of the association.

For these outstanding achievements, we have selected Dr. John McCarthy as a laureate of the Kyoto Prizes.

Lecture

Abstract of the Lecture

The Logic and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

The lecture discusses the history and present status of logic based approaches to artificial intelligence. It emphasizes topics on which I have worked. These include the formalization of common sense knowledge and reasoning, the notion of epistemologically adequate formalism, the situation calculus and formalized nonmonotonic reasoning. The lecture will not go into these topics deeply, since we don’t want to presume previous acquaintance with the topics.

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Workshop

Workshop

Logic Artificial Intelligence and Common Sense Reasoning

date
November 12, 1988 13:00-17:00
palce
Kyoto International Conference Center
Chairperson
Makoto Nagao Member, Kyoto Prize Screening Committee in Advanced Technology; Professor, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University

Program

13:10
Opening Remarks Makoto Nagao
Greetings Kazuo Inamori
President, The Inamori Foundation
Greetings Yoshifumi Sakurai
Chairman, Kyoto Prize Screening Committee in Advanced Technology;
Vice President, Setsunan University
Introduction of Achievement Makoto Nagao
13:25
Lecture John McCarthy
Laureate in Advanced Technology
"Open Problems in formalizing Common Sense"
14:25
Lecture Kazuhiro Fuchi
Member, Kyoto Prize Screening Committee in Advanced Technology
"Logic Machines"
15:05
Intermission
15:30
Lecture Masahiko Sato
Professor, Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University
"Constructive Mathematics and Lisp"
16:10
Lecture Ikuo Takeuchi
Senior Research Engineer, Supervisor, NTT Software Laboratories
"What Does Lisp Bring Us ?"
16:50
Questions and Answers
17:00
Closing
PAGETOP